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PostPosted: Thu May 21, 2009 1:25 pm 
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Posts: 114
Location: Netherlands
Hi Kep,

Thanks for asking and good to see you posting regularly again. I always love to see your pics of your kayak trips.
I use my oasis every week! :D (Unless the lake is frozen in winter, which is not often the case in our sea climate.)

My jib is still holding well, kind of amazing; ductape rules! But last months, I could not sail as often as I like. Either too much wind (according to my criteria) or too little time to rig it up.

Just like today. A day on which I had other serious responsibilities again!
Image

I will post some new jib pics if I 've made them.
("tie down strap", finally I know, thanx!)

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PostPosted: Fri May 22, 2009 9:51 pm 
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Location: sacramento california
Hi ya Scooby
Thats amazing news about your jib .
Shows just what a fine design/build project your Jib is even with using basic materials. 8)

What could be better than this photo of the crew underway..... one to paddle .......one to pedal ...one to make sandwiches and one to serve tea. Even one to take the picture of the rest !!
life is good :lol:


Keep paddling and sailing
Kepnutz :D


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PostPosted: Sat May 23, 2009 8:52 am 
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kepnutz wrote:
What could be better than this photo of the crew underway..... one to paddle .......one to pedal ...one to make sandwiches and one to serve tea.


Exactly, except that one of these crew members has to perform all these tasks on his own! The lazy other three concentrate on contributing to the factors fun, noise and joy only! Odd enough, the busy crew member seems to consider that an ample compensation! :D

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PostPosted: Sat May 23, 2009 6:47 pm 
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Location: Central Coast NSW Australia
G'Day Skua,
Great pic! 8)
Your Oasis keeps both adults and kids happy! Is there a more versatile craft?
(Well maybe the Tandem AI when it is finally released! :wink: )


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PostPosted: Sat May 23, 2009 8:55 pm 
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Location: sacramento california
Hi Scooby
You said it all there..!!
When you sit in the drivers seat on a Hobie mirage drive kayak you are busy busy busy.
You're even more so with a boat load of wild little monkey's :lol: .
Sure looks like a barrel of fun for the crew though :wink:
Happy Sailing
Kepnutz


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PostPosted: Sun May 24, 2009 2:14 pm 
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Location: Netherlands
Hi Stringy & Kep,

We are obviously still very happy with this versatile craft (although you are right Stringy, the tandem AI will be versatility champion for sure!). The "little monkey's" love to join on short trips, sit in the back and steer, play with leashed small boats (or do other games like throwing a ball or so overboard and try to pick it up, hoping the busy crew member is willing to cooperate!). It sure is "a barrel of fun" for the whole crew!

Still I am seriously considering to add the also incredibly versatile AI. That way we could go with the whole family (including the photographer!). Also, I could give the kids one boat and let them play around, while I am in the other, to help if needed. There are so many options, even more so with the tramps added. I guess I could even make a cat for the kids by joining the ama's!

To return to the topic: Kep, I don't have recent jib pics, but I had a movie that shows how the jib rig looks with a front passenger.
Maybe that interests you as well.

Image

As you can see, in that case I attach the jib to the far front of the boat. This gives the front passenger more room and leaves the front drive free to be used. Because the front drive is used now, the lee helm danger is not an issue in this case. Here a small series of stills made during the test ride:

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Image

Image

Image

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PostPosted: Mon May 25, 2009 6:54 pm 
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Location: sacramento california
Hi Scooby :)
Wow...that jib and sailing sequence looks as smooth as butter melting off a hot biscut !!
I could have used some extra wind and your jib yesterday on my trip in the local neighborhood river.
There was just enough wind to use both the main sail and my windpaddle sail in a couple of sections. The sails took us up river against the current in the tough sections but the wind died off in the easy flat water sections. Did not take but two camera phone photos but had a cool day out.
Have fun with your new AI .
Kepnutz


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 14, 2009 6:38 pm 
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Joined: Fri Nov 19, 2004 6:56 am
Posts: 822
Location: Tallahassee, FL
Hey Skua,
Beautiful job--and besides that it works! Can't beat that combination!!
Best from Florida,
Dick

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PostPosted: Mon Jun 15, 2009 7:48 pm 
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Posts: 19
Skua,
I just finished the sail rig. Adding the jib is a huge improvement. I get a much better point upwind, make much better forward progress, and I no longer need to peddle through a tack, plus it’s a lot more fun. The furling jib allows for instant sail reduction when “Gus” shows up (my sons name for Gusts), and I don’t have to worry about dumping the sail into his lap when approaching the beach. Sorry, no action photos yet, but once I’m able to convince someone to stay on the beach long enough to snap a couple of pictures, I should have some to post.

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Image

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The jib sail material of choice was going to be a shower curtain, but even the largest curtain was too small and I found the fabric shower curtain material to be too “stretchy.” So I used 3 mil. plastic tarp material and lined the edges, on both sides, with white duct tape for strength. If nothing else, it will make a good template for a monofilm sail to be made later. Right now the jib is a right triangle and measures approx 9’x6’x11’. I may taper it up to resemble Skua’s jib, which will give it a better look, and help it clear the head of whoever sits up front.
The jib never fully unfurls because the control line tends to spin up the PVC onto the edge of the sail. I tried a couple of things to prevent this, but once I was out on the water it proved not to be a bad thing because I noticed that there’s always at least one or two turns of tarp rolled onto the PVC, and the Duct Tape/PVC connection never gets fully exposed or weakened, at least not yet. The jib furls around a piece of half inch PVC which runs the length of the front stay and spins nicely on top of a stainless karabiner.

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This next shot shows the path of the furling line which neatly runs through the paddle holder slots, no blocks needed.

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In order to control the sail lines, I fabricated what you could call “control paddles” made of wood. I mounted jam cleats and pad eyes to the paddles, and all the sail control lines run through them. They are removable, adjustable, and their low profile allows for unobstructed paddling. They’ve really worked out well.

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The lines running into the right paddle are the main sheet (blue jam cleat) and starboard jib sheet (green jam cleat).

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The lines running into the left paddle are the port jib sheet (green jam cleat) and the jib furling line (red jam cleat).

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The inflatable sail rig is different from the rigs sold for the hard shell boats. For one, the mast for the inflatable is modular; it comes apart like a tent pole and breaks down into three sections. The rig is also stayed; anchored to the hull at three deck locations by three lines, or stays. The stays that come with the sail kit are basic nylon cord; they stretch considerably when under load even without a jib. If you’re going to construct a jib, replace them. West Marine sells 1/8 inch stay line with a 1% stretch tolerance for about 70 cents a foot; a bit pricey but it’s easy to work with and worth the cost. The inflatable sail kit is stayed from a point approx. ¾ of the way up the mast. To increase sail area I removed the forward factory stay and replaced it with one that runs from the top of the mast to the bow of the boat. To handle the additional weight of the forward sail I stayed the upper section of the mast with two additional side stays that run from the top of the mast to the factory deck stay locations. The mast is now supported by four side stays, two left and two right, and 1 forward stay.
The stays are hard to spot in the pics because they’re light in color.

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I mounted a wind vane to the top of the mast. It’s not a necessity by any means, but just something I’m used to sailing with. I used stainless threaded rod, bent it at a right angle, inserted it into the top of the mast and threaded a piece of pine closet pole (sprayed white) onto the rod for the vane to attach to. It works great. It’s a Davis Black Max, and it’s worth the $24.

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This last shot shows the path of the main sheet as it runs through a stern block and a second mini block attached to the paddle holder. I’d recommend using two blocks, you don’t want this line to get snagged or hung up when Gus shows up.

Image

I couldn’t have done a lot of this work without the helpful post, pics and descriptions from so many people on this forum.
So thank you “so many people.” :)


Last edited by 69cpu on Fri Jun 26, 2009 11:17 am, edited 4 times in total.

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PostPosted: Mon Jun 15, 2009 10:07 pm 
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Joined: Fri Mar 14, 2008 4:18 pm
Posts: 18
Location: Tasmania, Australia
G'day 69cpu

This is a very inspiring piece for all of use inflatable owners. It has has certainly provided much inspiration for me to keep working on my i12 rig. So far I have added a boom in the form of a large batten. Now with your fine "paddle holder" pad idea I can sort out a jib. The stays on the inflatable rig should be an advantage as it will help to make the leading edge of the jib stiffer !

Keep up the good work
Tasman


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 15, 2009 11:41 pm 
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Joined: Thu Aug 16, 2007 2:25 pm
Posts: 1951
Location: Central Coast NSW Australia
Very nice work 69cpu! 8)
Looking forward to some action photo's!


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 16, 2009 1:54 pm 
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Joined: Wed Oct 17, 2007 12:16 pm
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Location: Netherlands
Quote:
Hey Skua,
Beautiful job--and besides that it works! Can't beat that combination!!

Dick,
Thanks for the compliments, I always enjoyed your posts and pictures!

Quote:
Wow...that jib and sailing sequence looks as smooth as butter melting off a hot biscut !!
I could have used some extra wind and your jib yesterday on my trip in the local neighborhood river.

Thanks Kep, if you like, you can make one for yourself. It is not hard to do! If you've questions about details, just let me / us know!

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PostPosted: Tue Jun 16, 2009 2:03 pm 
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Location: Netherlands
69cpu,
Very nice job, it looks great! I really enjoy it to see how you applied my idea and enhanced it!

Judging from the photo's, the tarp clearly is the better choice over the shower curtain. It looks nicely flat and furls tight and neat. The "control paddles" are a great idea and look professional! A few questions:
It looks as if you use one long pvc pipe, without a flexible part. Is this correct? How do you raise and lower the jib? Where is the block halfway the mast used for (http://img132.imageshack.us/img132/1788/jkayak.jpg)?
In my rig, with only top stays, I see the mast really starts bending when the jib is pulling harder. Do you think your double stays help prevent that a little? Or do we have to ad a spreader to do that (may be a little over the top though...).

I think the issue of not being able to roll out the latest part of the jib can be solved quite easy. You can tie an extra line between the bow end the front most paddle holder and add a shackle about halfway. Then run the furling line through the shackle to the pvc. That way, the furling line has the correct angle towards the pvc/front-stay.

BTW, in case you want to have the pics show up directly in your post, take a look at stringy's step by step guide: viewtopic.php?t=9237

Again, I really enjoyed studying the pics, but now I'm ready to see the action photo's! ;)

Enjoy the sailing!

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PostPosted: Wed Jun 17, 2009 2:45 pm 
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Posts: 19
Skua,
What was nice about this project was, everything worked. The inflatable really lends itself to these types of modifications because of the way the sail rig was originally designed and because it’s such a stable boat (no need for amas).

To answer your questions:

I did use one solid piece of PVC pipe for the jib because I don’t have a need to fold it.

To step the mast and jib, I simply insert the base of the aluminum mast into the mast cup, attach the side stays and pull the jib karabiner forward and clip it onto the bow shackle; jib and main are raised. I hope this answered your question of how the jib is raised and lowered.

The block halfway up the mast had you scratching your head? I forgot to remove it, good eyes. I’ve been experimenting with reefing the main, and was using the block to help haul the back of the sail flush with the mast to depower it. It’s still a work in progress, unfortunately version 1 is going to require a version 2 or 3.

I am pleased with the way the mast holds up in strong winds with the additional side stays. In addition to your top stays, you should try staying your mast from the three quarter mark, it will strengthen it considerably. A spreader might just add stress at the point where it makes contact with the mast. The only disadvantage is that you forfeit your ability to furl your main.

I understand what you’re saying about keeping the furling line from spinning up the PVC, and noticed that you have something similar to what you described on your boat; I’ll give it a try.

Embedding the pics has been a drag. I’ve tried every [IMG] code combination I can think of. I even uploaded and tried links from photobucket thinking that maybe it was an ImageShack issue; they will not post. It’s tough being a newbie. I’ll figure it out eventually. Thanks for your help and comments.

Cheers.


Last edited by 69cpu on Mon Jun 22, 2009 2:47 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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PostPosted: Thu Jun 18, 2009 3:21 am 
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Joined: Thu Aug 16, 2007 2:25 pm
Posts: 1951
Location: Central Coast NSW Australia
I'm sorry you are having trouble embedding your excellent pics 69cpu :(
Here is your one of yours:
Image

It's important not to add/change the copied link from Imageshack. Your pics have an img at the beginning but they should begin with [url=http etc.
Look closely at this pic for the correct code to copy
Image


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