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PostPosted: Wed Aug 19, 2009 4:20 pm 
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I recently bought the Hobie wheels for my AI and love them -- it is so now much easier to move the boat to the launch. However, I am curious if anyone else has a good method for attaching the wheels when returning to a concrete boat launching ramp after a sail. I found it very difficult to get the wheel poles aligned properly under the back scupper holes when in 3 feet of water and waves coming in off the lake. Is there a good way to do this?

Thanks,

Tim


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 19, 2009 7:22 pm 
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Another good question. I have the same issue. I unload the hull from the roof of the car and attach wheels. Then I load up "stuff" and trundle down to the water. Launching is no problem.

Getting back to the ramp or beach I also find it difficult to get the wheels back in. Main problem is the yak is usually still full of "stuff". I find I have to do a partial unload, remove one ama/aka and roll the hull sideways.

One possible answer may be (as other have mentioned on here) partially filling the wheels with water to reduce their tendency to float.

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PostPosted: Wed Aug 19, 2009 7:57 pm 
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I encountered the same problem when I first got the boat and got excellent advice from Stringy to have faith - you get the hang of it. I am using standard wheels, so don't have much problem with excessive flotation. Pirate's idea of half filling the balloon tyres with water sounds like the best anyone has come up with. Once you've sorted that problem,the trick, once you've reached the ramp, is to get out and turn the boat sideways. That way you don't have to wade in too deep to reach the scuppers. Then just push the boat far enough out so you can just get the cart facing up under the boat and move it around till you feel at least one of the uprights engage one of the scuppers. It's then easy to move it till the second one engages. As someone said when I first asked about it, it's like touch typing - after a while you just get a feel for where the cart is relative to the scuppers. BTW, leave the ama out on the side you're working on or it will just get in the way.
Ah, just found the original thread: viewtopic.php?f=73&t=11496&

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PostPosted: Wed Aug 19, 2009 9:46 pm 
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I use the standard wheels and I found it very simple to get them back in while in 3 feet of water - no lifting or turning of the boat required.

I hold one pole by gripping the T between the pole on one side and the padded cross bar that connects to the other pole - like holding a gun. This way you can easily control turning the wheels around the axis of the pole you are holding. Then I submerge the wheels and insert only the pole I am holding - the trick is to put your left hand (if you are right handed) into the hole from the top, because your instincts will easily bring both hands into alignment, even without seeing. Once you feel the first pole going in, you can turn the pole and crossbar until the second pole pops in as well. Once they are in, they stay in. I know, I have sailed with wheels in for more than 10 minutes - once ;-) Hope this helps...


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 20, 2009 4:56 am 
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Yes half filling the balloon wheels with fresh water does make it simple to drop the cart over the side and into the scuppers prior to getting to the beach or ramp has proved a real winner as far as I am concerned. Mine has been that way for more than six months with no adverse problems. Great when approaching with an onshore wind as the cart creates considerable drag and slows the rig down and becomes more controllable. It works by taking some of the buoyancy out of the cart so immersing it under the boat becomes very simple. An added advantage is that the rig becomes more stable when moving around whilst on the shore too. As a pirate I was considering half filling the wheels with rum, to be stored in case of an emergency at sea.....Arrrr...What do you reckon Cocky?....Pirate :wink:

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PostPosted: Thu Aug 20, 2009 6:37 am 
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So Pirate, do you put the cart in place while you are still out on the water? That's interesting.

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PostPosted: Thu Aug 20, 2009 9:15 am 
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Location: Rogers, AR
I have recently purchased a PA, and love it. As fall approaches and winter, I get to thinking about using my yak when the water is cold. Two things occur to me as I ponder this...having to stand in the water to pull the wheels on entry, and reinstalling them on return...both times require me to stand and reach into the water. Some of you guys who have been using your yaks to fish out of in the colder months could possibly tell me what I have to do to accomplish this while the water is to cold to be in a bathing suit. I can't bear the thought of having to wait till the water warms enough again to be in...


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 20, 2009 12:07 pm 
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Here in upstate New York, its hot at the moment but due to the AI's thoroughly wet ride in any moderate wind, we've taken to wearing high top kayaking boots, waterproof rain pants and splash jacket (and will also put on gloves as the temperature gets cooler). The clothes help a lot but the boots are only about 30in tall and that defines the depth of water one can walk around in. I don't think that will be enough for jockeying the wheels back on when returning to a launch ramp. I concur with the notion that water exposure in colder temps is not what you want.


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 20, 2009 2:32 pm 
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timo wrote:
Here in upstate New York, its hot at the moment but due to the AI's thoroughly wet ride in any moderate wind, we've taken to wearing high top kayaking boots, waterproof rain pants and splash jacket (and will also put on gloves as the temperature gets cooler). The clothes help a lot but the boots are only about 30in tall and that defines the depth of water one can walk around in. I don't think that will be enough for jockeying the wheels back on when returning to a launch ramp. I concur with the notion that water exposure in colder temps is not what you want.

It's definitely possible to get the wheels in or out in less than 30 inches of water. Also, I gather Pirate manages to get the wheels in or out while sitting in the boat. I believe that's possible, though I've never tried it (the water here never gets that cold).

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PostPosted: Thu Aug 20, 2009 2:53 pm 
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chrisj wrote:
timo wrote:
Here in upstate New York, its hot at the moment but due to the AI's thoroughly wet ride in any moderate wind, we've taken to wearing high top kayaking boots, waterproof rain pants and splash jacket (and will also put on gloves as the temperature gets cooler). The clothes help a lot but the boots are only about 30in tall and that defines the depth of water one can walk around in. I don't think that will be enough for jockeying the wheels back on when returning to a launch ramp. I concur with the notion that water exposure in colder temps is not what you want.

It's definitely possible to get the wheels in or out in less than 30 inches of water. Also, I gather Pirate manages to get the wheels in or out while sitting in the boat. I believe that's possible, though I've never tried it (the water here never gets that cold).


That's right Chris. As long as you remove some of the buoyancy from the wheels by adding water, inserting and removing one handed whilst on the AI is a breeze...Pirate :wink:

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PostPosted: Fri Aug 21, 2009 6:25 am 
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There's no doubt about it Pirate. You are truly an ideas man.

That idea is going straight to the pool room.... I'm definately going to try that!

Dad: Could you move the Tinny, I need to get the Haines Hunter out so I can get to the Hobies? Son: I'll have to get the keys to the ride-on if I'm gonna move that Tinny
Dad: Yeah, watch the boat mate
Son: Yeah

Ah. The serenity!

*Apols to the yanks who won't have a clue what I'm on about :lol:

Dave

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PostPosted: Fri Aug 21, 2009 5:30 pm 
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Location: Rogers, AR
We still have the problem of "cold" water and exposure when launching...returning isn't to big a deal, cause we can run for the car. However; if you are wet starting out on the start of the day could cause some problems.
One other thing I wonder about, is would the waders (boots you mentioned) sink you if you went in the drink?
I am thinking maybe a wet suit is the only safe thing, but doesn't sound too comfortable. I really don't want to stop fishing just because the water temp goes beyond hypothermia conditions. Any thoughts...and you got wet pirate putting those wheels on or off, right..you haven't figured how to do that dry, right?


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 21, 2009 5:51 pm 
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Sorry Ron but I find myself wading in up to my knees off our beaches and ramps and one arm getting wet retrieving and inserting the wheels and appears no way around that problem other than dressing up in dry suits...Stay warm...Pirate :wink:

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PostPosted: Sat Aug 22, 2009 1:57 am 
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Simple solution is a called a dry suit : even if you have to walk in water waist deep at the beginning of your session, with wind exposure, even on a winter day, it dries. And anyway you were dry inside all along.
On the other hand, make sure to get a breathable one or you'll soon end up soaked with perspiration when pedaling.

One thought about the water-inside-the-wheels idea : how much do you have to put in ? I don't like the idea of adding unnecessary weight to the boat. All the more that I store my cart in the front hatch and we all know the bow already rides low and don't want to worsen things.


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PostPosted: Sat Aug 22, 2009 3:18 am 
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arno wrote:
Simple solution is a called a dry suit : even if you have to walk in water waist deep at the beginning of your session, with wind exposure, even on a winter day, it dries. And anyway you were dry inside all along.
On the other hand, make sure to get a breathable one or you'll soon end up soaked with perspiration when pedaling.

One thought about the water-inside-the-wheels idea : how much do you have to put in ? I don't like the idea of adding unnecessary weight to the boat. All the more that I store my cart in the front hatch and we all know the bow already rides low and don't want to worsen things.


Arno the right amount is just under half full or about 40% which I established from trial and error. I stow mine in the rear well under an ocky strap which secures it and makes the boat balanced and very convenient and easy to get to when coming back on shore. If you are already using that area for an ice-box or similar, you can carry the cart inverted in the scuppers behind the seat.There is definately a weight difference with the added water but which I believe makes no difference at all to the performance of the AI.

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