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PostPosted: Sat Mar 14, 2009 11:32 pm 
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Joined: Sat Nov 12, 2005 10:46 pm
Posts: 2390
Location: Escondido
I got to borrow a Pro Angler for a few days. So many cool new features, I wondered where to begin. Since there seemed to be some questions about handling this weight, I decided to bring out the scales and see just what to expect (all measurements are on my official bathroom scale).

For all practical purposes, the weights listed below are the ones that would be most meaningful. (*Complete weight info provided at bottom of this article).

60 lb. for an overhead lift (estimated).
33 lb. handling weight on wheels, all trays, boxes etc installed.
27 lb. handling weight on wheels, no accessories

Loading in back of truck:
As you can see, this is a no brainer if you have a truck. You don't need a bed extender if you have a 6' bed with tailgate or longer. This is your 27 or 33 lb. lift; the entire process can be done with one hand on a level surface.
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I do use a bed extender though on boats that aren't mine, just to take no chances with Murphy!
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Loading overhead onto kayak rack from behind:
This could accommodate several applications. Here I positioned the stern of the boat behind the truck with a little overlap on the rear of the vehicle. Lifting the bow onto the rear rack is the most difficult aspect, requiring about 60 lb. or less of overhead dead lift.
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The boat sits nicely on its built in skid pads (very thoughtful Hobie!). Lift the boat by the stern handle and push. I found this much easier than I thought it would be.
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As you can see, even an old guy can do this, and I think my wife could do it too. (She is much younger by at least 2 years). Fortunately for her she was working when I did this. :lol:
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The racks and saddles are set for my Adventure and seem to work fine for the PA as well without modification.
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So what is the most weight I had to lift at one time in order to handle the Pro Angler? 33 lb for a truck bed and 60 lb. for the overhead, thanks to a well placed handle system, wheel cart location and skid plates. Was the boat hard to handle? Not at all.

So the last question is how to get the cart on and off. Simply roll the boat on its side to insert or remove the cart. The boat is quite stable sitting that way and the cart seems to easily handle the side load.
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I also attach and remove the cart in the water. It takes a little practice, but is not difficult to master and makes handling a piece of cake from vehicle to launch. You can even leave the cart in after launch for a great workout! (Just kidding of course).

A couple of notes here on using the cart with the Pro Angler.

1. The cart is not designed for extended storage. If you store the boat on the cart, you will likely dent the skeg and the wheels may eventually rub on the hull. With the weight of this boat, it won't take too long. Use the cart for transportation only!

2. Tennis balls mounted on the cart take some of the load off the skeg and transfer it to the scuppers. This distributes the weight to 3 points rather than one and is easier on the hull.
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Unfortunately this precludes the use of the cool locking pin with the Pro Angler. There are a few ways to work around this, but not within the scope here.

In Part II we'll take a look at some of the features, and in Part III we'll see how the Pro Angler handles and performs on the water. 8)
____________________________________________________________
*
102 lb. -- finished boat, less seat. Includes hatches, cutting board, rails / rail mounts, rod
------------tubes, bungees, rudder system, etc.
15 lb. --- seat with mounting frame.
117 lb. -- finished boat with seat. I consider this transportation weight and what I used.
10 lb. --- 2 trays (front and middle hatch), 4 Plano boxes, 1 lure hangar box, bottle, bottle.
------------holder, paddle "T" handle (all included with boat).
10 lb. --- Mirage Drive, Turbofins and paddle (all included with boat).


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PostPosted: Sun Mar 15, 2009 4:12 pm 
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Joined: Wed Mar 04, 2009 5:12 pm
Posts: 48
Location: South Jersey
Thanks Roadrunner. Very informative stuff. I enjoy everything I can learn about the PA. I just can't wait to actually see one in person.

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Give a man a fish and he'll eat for a day. Teach a man to fish and he'll sit in his boat (or kayak)and drink beer all day.


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 17, 2009 3:31 pm 
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Joined: Mon Dec 24, 2007 8:32 pm
Posts: 111
Location: Pearland TX Kayak: Hobie Outback
Thanks Road Runner. As usual I read post out of order and come up with alot of questions that are already answered.
Brazos

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PostPosted: Tue Mar 17, 2009 3:39 pm 
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Joined: Thu Sep 11, 2008 6:42 pm
Posts: 62
What keeps the water from leaking in the hull though the rudder string holes? It seems like they would be submerged when you're on the water.


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 17, 2009 9:17 pm 
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Hobie Approved Guru

Joined: Sat Nov 12, 2005 10:46 pm
Posts: 2390
Location: Escondido
Notice the small black cover plate on the aft deck in this picture:
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Notice that it sits well above the waterline and forward of the stern.

That's the rudder access bay. This is what it looks like inside:
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The rudder post sits in a molded-in brass bushing that exits through the hull underneath. The black cord is your rudder up-haul line. This goes through a hole that is also sealed off from the hull interior just like a scupper. This area is wet in the picture because I hosed the boat off with the cover plate removed shortly before the picture was taken. Normally, moisture in this area (if any) would come from the wet rudder uphaul line after rudder retraction.

As you can see, this compartment would have to flood to get any water in through the rudder lines. Any water that enters the hull would be more likely come from one of the hatches if the deck was awash from a large boat wake or heavy seas.

I see a small amount of water in the hull as normal in the course of kayaking, except when it's calm. With my activities in the Adventure and AI, water sometimes rolls across the foredeck or aft deck, momentarily covering the hatches, and I can expect to find a little water inside later. It's always prudent to stow any items that need to remain dry in a sealed container or dry bag. Even Dry bags can leak though, as others have reported. 8)


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 18, 2009 4:10 pm 
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Joined: Thu Sep 11, 2008 6:42 pm
Posts: 62
Thanks for the explanation RR. That is the best kayak I have ever seen. They will be a smashing success IMO.


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