Hobie Cat Forums

It is currently Tue Sep 02, 2014 11:04 am

All times are UTC - 8 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 17 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next
Author Message
PostPosted: Fri Nov 19, 2004 7:48 am 
Offline
Site Rank - Deck Hand

Joined: Fri Nov 19, 2004 7:00 am
Posts: 4
Location: Upstate NY
To the hardcore cat sailors/racers, I apologize. Hit the "ignore" key.

For everyone else, I apologize for the length.

First post for me. Why? I don't own a cat, and haven't sailed since I was a teen (30 yrs ago) when I crewed a few times for a buddy who raced. Hell, i didn't even know what he was telling me to do (I don't speak Sailing), I just worked a sail and added ballast for hiking out (my strong suit - good ballast :lol: ).

I'm starting to think about buying a cat. Nope, never even been on one. Maybe my thinking is because of that Toyota commercial with the guy who has a case of "Adrenalitis."

So why the post? Sort of a dipstick for testing my sanity. I'm hoping you can help me either return to "normal," or fully embrace my disorder. :?

What do I need to know up front as I contemplate spending some of my kids' inheritance on a Hobie Cat?

I am thinking about a Wave as my virgin vessel. Reasons: Easy to assemble on the beach, inexpensive, I can sail/assemble alone (after my divorce when I tell the wife :evil: ). Any differing opinions?

I would need a trailer.

My list of stuff I would need includes:
- A boat - one I can sail alone, but also carry a couple others
- Trailer (and a hitch on the car)
- Life vests (I'll buy one for my son, but I'll rent one for my wife - she doesn't know what I'm thinking, and may explode when she finds out)
- Learn to sail

What else do I need and/or need to know?

Any one else been on the edge of the cliff and debated whether to plunge?

Should I drop this stupid talk, have another beer, and fake excitement over new golf clubs?

I'm from around Syracuse (yep, there's a dealer), so I have about 6 or 8 months to think about it.

C'mon folks, send me back to society with my tail between my legs

-or-

convince me to join you in flying a hull.

Tom


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Wave
PostPosted: Fri Nov 19, 2004 8:42 am 
Offline
Site Rank - Old Salt

Joined: Thu Jun 05, 2003 9:57 am
Posts: 1603
Location: Clear Lake Iowa
Wave is a good choice, we just got two of them and they are really easy to sail, lots of flotation, and you can set one up in like 10 minutes. We started sailing Hobies 5 years ago, I have a number of them now, but its one of the best things I ever did for my kids. I have a 14,13 and a 5 year old. The two older ones are accomplished sailors, and race as a team. The younger one goes to sailing school in the summer time and could probably pilot a Wave by himself If my wife would let him go out.
Just do it.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Nov 19, 2004 9:05 am 
Offline
Site Rank - Deck Hand

Joined: Tue Mar 23, 2004 10:57 am
Posts: 14
Location: Mason City, IA
I went through this 3 summers ago. Only difference is I had NEVER been on a sailboat. Nevertheless I got bit by the bug, and after a long winter of consideration bought my first boat - an inexpensive 30 year old, 21 foot monohull.

Taught myself to sail by reading books and trial and error. After a year on my own, I fell into a Hobie crowd pretty much by accident, but was hooked from the start. Now I own two boats, the monohull and a Hobie 16 nearly as old. The monohull just sits in storage.

I say go for it! But depending on how large your children's inheritance is, don't shy away from saving some money with a decent used boat to get started. I too had a less than fully enthusiastic spouse, but since I didn't spend much money at any given time, she rolled with it.

By the way, why bother "renting" a lifejacket? They aren't that expensive, and your wife is more likely to feel part of the decision/action if she has her own gear, even if she rarely uses it (like mine). If she doesn't use it, a spare lifejacket is a good thing to have anyway.

As far as a tip, mine would simply be DO IT.

Mathew


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Nov 19, 2004 11:41 am 
Offline
Site Rank - Deck Hand

Joined: Thu Jun 05, 2003 10:18 am
Posts: 6
Location: mid-Atlantic
Consider a Getaway. Its plastic like the wave, so it takes a lot of abuse. The advantage is that you can take the whole family out on it. I don't quite understand why your wife would not like you to take up this sport (unless she is terrified of water). It can involve the whole family, you can do it for a lifetime and it will give your kids a lifelong skill they can always enjoy. If the kids get into racing, so much the better. Being involved in a cool sport is one of the best antidotes for drugs and other bad things that are out there. Go for it and make it a family thing.

David
H20


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Nov 19, 2004 11:45 am 
Offline
Authorized Hobie Dealer

Joined: Mon Jun 02, 2003 7:35 pm
Posts: 1370
Location: 315 N. Hwy 79 Panama City Beach, FL 32413 850-235-2281
The wave is a great choice! There is nothing better you can do for your family other than getting them into Hobie cat sailing! Join Hobie fleet 204 and buy a cat. Your local dealer is a great place to start. They will be able to put you into a boat, new or used, and all the goodies you will need to get going. One of the best things my fokes did for me was get me a Hobie Cat, it tought me how to be patience and pay attention. I honestly believe that where I am today is because I started sailing Hobie Cats! JUST DO IT!

Thanks,
Brad Stephens
http://www.sunjammers.com/
Hobie Division 15 Chairman
Authorized Hobie/Vanguard/Hunter Dealer
brad@sunjammers.com
850-235-2281
Panama City Beach, FL


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Nov 19, 2004 1:02 pm 
Offline
Site Rank - Deck Hand

Joined: Fri Nov 19, 2004 7:00 am
Posts: 4
Location: Upstate NY
Guys, thanks for the shoes to my aft. See, I'm learning.

My reason for considering a Wave over a Getaway are twofold:
1. I can sail it easily by myself (I thought the Getaway may be too much boat - remember, I've never done this before)
2. I figure I can get in cheap, then when I buy some sailing skills, trade up (like golf advice, "You don't need new clubs, you need a swing!")

Flawed thinking?

I am a little wider than the sailors in the brochure (about 270), but the Wave is supposed to handle 800 lbs. Fortunately, just about everyone I would want to take sailing is much smaller than me. :D

Will I be able to get screaming with either the Wave or the Getaway if I end up sailing solo?

My wife's objection to all this is green and folds up to fit in your pocket.
We have a kid in college (2nd year, private school), and are cash flow challenged right now. I'm convinced we need to just break out from the self-imposed monastery and do the opposite, like George Costanza.

I printed out a map to the dealer. Again, thanks for the shove!

Tom


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Nov 19, 2004 4:24 pm 
Offline
Site Rank - Old Salt

Joined: Thu Mar 25, 2004 5:39 pm
Posts: 433
Location: West Texas
Hey bro, if you're concerned about $$, you could start out with an older Hobie 16 for around $1000, including trailer. You could easily sail that yourself and certainly take along another adult or two kids. If you wind up really enjoying it (and so does the wife) then you could trade up to a newer and pricier Getaway, but I think you'll enjoy the heck out of the 16. I might be biased, though. :)

As far as a life jacket, you can get really nice neoprene ones at Wal-Mart in the spring for $29. You can also get like, $9.99 sailing gloves at West Marine that'll only last one season but that's enough time to decide if you like sailing or not. Plus after one season a $1000 H16 won't really have depreciated hardly at all. Unless you sail it into a rock or something. ;)

_________________
Warm regards,

Jim

Image


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Nov 20, 2004 6:39 am 
I would say either a Wave or Hobie 16. A good used Wave being my first choice.Try to get the club edition. I bought a Hobie 16 for very little $$$ but, I have been sailing for a while. Get some lessons! You will enjoy the whole experience more when you have a body of knowledge to draw from. The Wave is a very stable, fun little boat. Even owning an H-16, I wouldn't mind owning a Wave too. Go for it.


Top
  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Nov 20, 2004 7:19 pm 
Offline
Site Rank - Deck Hand

Joined: Sun Oct 10, 2004 7:56 pm
Posts: 7
I was in the same situation and went with the Getaway. I actually finally got it out today after it sat in the garage for 6 weeks. The Getaway is great, but it is a bit heavy to move around yourself. One thing I didn't realize is how hard it can be to rig these boats. Getting the 25' mast up on the Getaway is pretty tough and is really a two person job. The Wave is only 20' and shouldn't be as heavy.

If you're going to be solo, I'd say the wave. If you want to bring other people and will sail with others, I'd recommend the Getaway.

Good luch and get sailing!

Pete


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: I'm buying a Club Wave
PostPosted: Sun Nov 21, 2004 11:21 am 
Offline
Site Rank - Deck Hand

Joined: Fri Nov 19, 2004 7:00 am
Posts: 4
Location: Upstate NY
All,

Thanks for your sage advice. You convinced me, or gave me information I needed to make an informed decision.

I went to the local dealer yesterday. I have started the ball rolling on buying a used Club Wave.

If I find it too small, I will move up to a Getaway in 2006. By then I should know a little more about sailing.

Since I live in the frozen tundra of upstate NY, I won't be sailing until spring. I will be day dreaming about it, though.

...and trying to learn how to sail from books.

Again, thanks. Maybe I'll see you on the water.

Tom


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: First things first
PostPosted: Wed Dec 01, 2004 12:07 pm 
Offline
Site Rank - Old Salt

Joined: Wed Jun 30, 2004 6:39 am
Posts: 471
Location: Finger Lakes, NY
First- have that other beer anyway. Hobie sailors often are on the fringe of being nuts so beer only helps to calm us down. :twisted:

Second- I am reading your post for the first time and just heard John Lennon singing "last night my wife said, oh boy when you're dead, you don't take nothing with you but your soul". I was thinking, it should be a happy soul. Nothing except fishing makes my soul happier than sailing.

Hope everything works out well for you. The people at the Syracuse Boat Works Ltd are great. Rob really helpful and Barb has handled some difficult orders for me and from me.

Today is a scorcher in upstate NY, Horseheads, 48 degrees and gusts to 40+mph. Wish I had a boat in the water. It will be a warm December I think. Come on down to Seneca Lake when you get your pontoons under you. Where will you be sailing mostly?

At the first sign of storm, we sail- :) From another mid-lifer- Stephen

OH yeah tom - I agree with everything that JaimeZX posted. The 16 is very versatile, probably the most versatile and fun boat in the stable but the used club Wave will be great. Go for it. You can't take it with you

_________________
The fact that this windy world is largely covered in water obviously means that man was meant to sail.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: My meter reads "SANE"
PostPosted: Fri Dec 03, 2004 7:05 am 
Offline
Site Rank - Deck Hand

Joined: Fri Nov 19, 2004 7:00 am
Posts: 4
Location: Upstate NY
Hey Stephen,

Thanks for the extra shove. Lennon was a visionary. :D

I am in the greater Utica area.

I already made it out to the Boat Works, it was a couple of weeks ago on the weekend. It had snowed overnight and was just melting off. I didn't catch the guy's name, but he must have thought I had chewed through the leather straps that morning.

The conversation went like this (remember, it had snowed overnight):

Me: "Hi. I want to buy a sailboat."
Him: "Do you know how to sail?"
Me: "Nope, not yet. Should I learn to sail before I buy a boat?"
Him: "I suppose you can learn when you put it in the water. Do you know anybody who could teach you how to sail?"
Me: "Nope."

He filled me in about the Syracuse Fleet 204, and had me wander around the boats outside in the yard. There were more than a dozen Hobies, including a few Getaways. So now I have at least seen a cat in person. I suppose that is a first step.

Yep, you gotta love NY winter. We picked up an inch or so this morning, but the feet we are expecting have been holding off so far this season.

I'm not sure how long it will take me to figure out how to drive a sailboat, so the Finger Lakes may not be in my immediate future. I would like to spend the night on land - they are some big lakes for a rookie to drift across. But then again, with a big lake there is more water and less stuff to bump in to.

I will probably get it wet at a friend's camp around Morrisville. Once I get some sea legs I may venture out to Oneida Lake, to see how the real cat sailors run them. I will keep the invite to Seneca Lake on the back burner though, thanks.

My decision to get the Wave was as much "easy for a newbie to sail solo" as economic. The Wave starts out quite inexpensive and seems to hold its value well, in case my wife is right after all. :lol:

So I guess reading, and re-reading, "Sailing for Idiots" will have to fend off a case of Cabin Fever for the next few months. That, and another beer.

Thanks again,

Tom - tgnytg at hotmail dot com


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Dec 15, 2004 7:50 am 
Offline
Site Rank - Old Salt

Joined: Wed Jun 30, 2004 6:39 am
Posts: 471
Location: Finger Lakes, NY
Tom-
Good choice on the boat- not that there is a bad one when it comes to Hobie's, but I think you did a good thing. You can add a 16 to the stable later :)

On the "how to's" of sailing: There is a lot of really good sailing information on this site from members sharing ideas on how TO do things and also how to NOT do things. Nothing overall can beat hands-on time with another catter. I would join Fleet 204 if I lived up there.

On the "hardware" of sailing: There are great ideas borne of necessity just because something was broke and someone also was broke or because someone was clever and found out a better way to do something. You will find that hardware can become an issue as well as it gives other people an idea of what to give you for Christmas. (Start dropping hints now) :wink:

In the meantime the summer's gone, the fall has fell, winter's here and it's cold as ... well as it was last year at this time :shock: :lol:

-Stephen

_________________
The fact that this windy world is largely covered in water obviously means that man was meant to sail.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: my experiance
PostPosted: Thu Jan 06, 2005 9:00 pm 
Offline
Site Rank - Deck Hand

Joined: Thu May 06, 2004 7:22 am
Posts: 5
Location: Edgartown, Martha's Vineyard
Just thought Id offer my experance:

We got a hobie 16 (used, about 1000) and a trailer at the end of a summer. This Hobie 16 is fun, but be werent used to the strange tiller extension system and other more racing-oriented features of the hobie 16. We got rid of this boat after research and decided to go with the wave. We thought about the getaway, but after having some frightening experiances lifting the Hobie 16 mast, we thought a heavier mast just wasnt the way to go. With the wave, i can step the mast myself, and the 2 piece mast makes trailering easy. (this is starting to sound like a commercial i know) Also, the wave is so light and can go from sitting on a trailer to sailing in less than 10 minutes (when your NOT experianced) I got the jib option for my hobie, and although its not very big, it tacks on alot of speed! One thing to keep in mind before doing this is it adds enjoyment for a crew, but the blocks and the pole across the bow are not removeable (not a huge disadvantage)

So, good choice, and hopefully you'll enjoy it as much as we do!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Feb 26, 2005 10:46 am 
Offline
Site Rank - Admiral

Joined: Sat Feb 07, 2004 8:28 am
Posts: 192
I do not have a lot of Hobie Wave and Getaway experience... only used them a few times in a rental setting. One thing that I did not like about the wave is it's lack of "power". IIRC the thing has less them 100 sqfeet of sail area (I remember 95) while the roto molted hulls make the thing heavy.
If I would be allowed (wife) to buy something new/different I would not look into either wave or getaway.
I would recomend to hook up with some local cut sailors and find out what you can handle before you spend money on something that will be sold at the end of the season. If you would live in TX I would offer you a ride in the next weeks - I am sure there will be someone in your area as well.

Patrick


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 17 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next

All times are UTC - 8 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Exabot [Bot] and 3 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group